Eat Whole Grains

http://www.medpagetoday.com/PrimaryCare/DietNutrition/58565

High intake of whole grains was associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all cause mortality, as well as mortality from respiratory disease, infectious disease, diabetes, and all noncardiovascular, noncancer causes.

Swapping Rice for Burgers

Source: China obesity ‘explosion’ blamed on swapping rice for burgers

Over 40 years ago I lost 200 pounds.  With age I found 35 of those lost pounds but remain extremely pleased the other 165 stayed off.  I loved this article about obesity in China.  This article could have been written about my childhood.  I swapped burgers for rice and got fat.

Real fat.

I’ve been part of a weight loss study for decades.  I answer a couple of questionnaires every year.  Most people don’t believe I used to be fat.  I need to find some old childhood pictures and post them as proof.

Your Healthy Lifestyle Won’t Necessarily Make You Healthier

Public health researchers are beginning to see that changes in how you live are no guarantee of changes in your health.

Source: Your Healthy Lifestyle Won’t Necessarily Make You Healthier | WIRED

Understand there are limits.  Kale, quinoa, and the latest antioxidant, anti-aging diet, exercise routine, hot sweaty yoga, mindfulness meditation, whatever only helps your health.  There is no perfect diet.  There is no perfect exercise regimen.  There is no magic bullet.

Top 10 Plant Based Research and News – 2015

Top 10 Plant-Based Research and News Stories of 2015

 

For all of my veggie readers.

High glycemic index diet as a risk factor for depression: analyses from the Women’s Health Initiative

High glycemic index diet as a risk factor for depression: analyses from the Women’s Health Initiative.

Results: We found a progressively higher dietary GI to be associated with increasing odds of incident depression in fully adjusted models (OR for the fifth compared with first quintile: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.37), with the trend being statistically significant (P = 0.0032). Progressively higher consumption of dietary added sugars was also associated with increasing odds of incident depression (OR for the fifth compared with first quintile: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.41; P-trend = 0.0029). Higher consumption of lactose, fiber, nonjuice fruit, and vegetables was significantly associated with lower odds of incident depression, and nonwhole/refined grain consumption was associated with increased odds of depression.

via High glycemic index diet as a risk factor for depression: analyses from the Women’s Health Initiative.