Eat More Fiber

If there’s one thing the standard American diet (SAD) lacks, it’s fiber. Daily recommendations are set at 25 to 30 grams, but less than 3 percent of Americans consume that much.[1] In fact, most are getting an average of only 15 grams per day.[2] By contrast, among more than 71,000 subjects participating in the Adventist Health Study-2, those consuming a vegan diet (5,694 subjects) consumed an average of 46 grams of fiber daily.[3]

The Fiber Dilemma – Eating Plant-Based Without Tummy Trouble

Read the full article at the link above.

Plant-Based Harm Reduction

Plant-Based Diet Linked to Lower Heart Failure Risk

The study was published in the April 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Researchers followed more than 16,000 adults (mean age, 64 years) with no known coronary heart disease (CHD) or HF at baseline, comparing those who adhered to a plant-based diet with those who consumed a Southern diet, consisting of more fried and processed foods and sweetened drinks. They found that the plant-based diet was associated with a 41% lower risk for incident HF with the highest vs lowest adherence, while the Southern diet was associated with a 71% higher risk for HF with higher vs lower adherence, after adjustment for potential demographic, lifestyle, and medical confounders.

Plant-Based Diets Help Reduce Kidney Disease Risk Long Term

A diet that favors plant-based foods, as well as a completely vegetarian diet, modestly reduces the long-term risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general population provided individuals are not overweight or obese to begin with, a new community-based cohort study indicates.

Reminder:

I am not a vegan.

 

Low Meat or No Meat?

“Did you see the Loma Linda study that shows eating even small amounts of red meat will cause an early death?”

“Yes I did.  What did you think of the study?”

“Uh…I didn’t read it.”

To be honest I got pretty excited when I saw the headline:

Eating small amounts of red and processed meats may increase risk of early death

Click bait works.  So I read the article.  Then I went to the the journal Nutrients downloaded the actual study and read it.

Red and Processed Meat and Mortality in a Low Meat Intake Population

Decent study but remember correlation is not causation.  And the inherent limitations in most studies of this type will be measurement error in dietary assessment as the research team itself fully acknowledges.  As I was reading this study my attention turned to this:

During a mean follow-up of 11.8 years, there were 7961 deaths, of which 2598 were due to CVD and 1873 were due to cancers. Compared with zero-intake subjects, those with the highest intake of unprocessed red meat were younger, less educated, and less physically active. They also had higher prevalence of current smoking, alcohol use, and slightly higher BMI. Regarding dietary characteristics, they tended to have lower intakes of cruciferous vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and nuts and seeds, and higher intakes of dairy, eggs, unprocessed poultry, and processed meat.

And this:

AHS-2 participants were requested at enrollment to complete a quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) consisting of more than 200 food items. Unprocessed red meat intake was reported as two items in the FFQ: “hamburger, ground beef (in casserole, meatballs, etc.)” and “beef or lamb as a main dish (e.g., steak, roast, stew, and pot pies)”. Processed meat was reported as: “processed beef, lamb (e.g., sausage, salami, and bologna)” and “processed chicken or turkey (e.g., turkey bologna, and turkey ham)”. Pork was classified as processed meat because most of the pork products listed in the single pork question in the FFQ were processed (i.e., “pork (bacon, sausage, ham, chops, ribs, and lunch-meat)”). The frequency of intake ranged from “never or rarely” to “2+ per day”, and serving sizes consisted of three levels (a half serving, standard serving (3–4 oz.), and one-and-a-half servings).

I am still not a vegan.

I am not a Vegan

“Are you a vegan?”

No.

“Are you a vegetarian?”

No.  I just don’t eat as much animal proteins as I used to.

“So where do you get your protein from?”

Plant-Based-Sources-of-Protein

Plant-Based Protein Chart

Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. This means you are free to use my work for personal use (e.g., save the file to your computer or share via social media) as long as you do not modify the image or use the image for commercial purposes ($).

Original posting is from Dana McDonald RD LD aka the Rebel Dietician.

The Unoriginal Cabbage Soup

Nothing of importance is ever achieved without discipline. I feel myself sometimes not wholly in sympathy with some modern educational theorists, because I think that they underestimate the part that discipline plays. But the discipline you have in your life should be one determined by your own desires and your own needs, not put upon you by society or authority.

Bertrand Russell

We all know better, but we don’t choose better. I was a cokehead, a heroin addict. At night you get coked up knowing you’re going to feel terrible in the morning. You have to make the habit of doing what’s difficult now to make you better. It’s easy to do the right thing when you’re used to it.

Russell Simmons

I named this soup Unoriginal because there’s really nothing original about cabbage soup.  It could just as easily be called What’s in the Fridge Soup because I had a small head of cabbage that needed to be eaten.  There were two halves of two different peppers and half an onion.  What do you do with these odds and ends?

Soup.

Something happened to me this summer.  I was a lapsed vegetarian for over 30 years and in the beginning of August I got serious about my diet (again).  Kyrie credits his diet for the recent Celtics winning streak.  Clearly something is happening to a lot of people.  It’s not just me.

Choose better.  Losing 200 pounds was not easy.  Regaining 40 pounds was easy.  Making the right food choices?  Trust me, it’s easier than you think.

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic minced
1/2 large onion, thin sliced
2 carrots, peeled cut into coins
1 stalk celery sliced thin diagonally
1/2 each red and green bell pepper, slice
1 cup frozen corn
7 oz canned diced tomatoes with juice
1 small head green cabbage sliced
1 quart organic vegetable broth
1/2 Tbsp paprika
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp dried thyme
Salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a medium size pot heat the olive oil.
  2. Everybody (except tomatoes, corn and broth) in the pool in the following order: onion, carrots, celery, peppers, garlic, cabbage.
  3. Saute until the cabbage wilts, add herbs, salt, and pepper.
  4. Add vegetable broth and tomatoes.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer.
  5. Simmer partially covered for 30 minutes.  Add corn and simmer an additional 5-10 minutes.
  6. Yum.

 

Garlic Toast with Balsamic Tomatoes and White Beans

It’s been really interesting getting used to the new ingredient selection and price differences at the grocery stores since moving from New Orleans to Nashville. One major difference is that canned goods at Kroger are almost half the price of the canned goods at the local grocery store that I used to frequent.

Source: Garlic Toast with Balsamic Tomatoes and White Beans

I personally have not tried this recipe but the pictures look awesome and I wanted to “bookmark” the source.  I’ve been following Budget Bytes for some time and Beth does a great job.

Besides the beans, tomatoes and pictures what caught my eye was the comment on the food cost differential by geography.  Why should canned beans be twice the price in one city versus another?  Dynamic pricing and profits.  Simple answer.

Beans are cheap.  And beans are cheaper in Oklahoma too.

The 90% Solution

H Robert Silverstein, MD, FACC

After 47 years as a cardiologist with 200,000 patient visits, I can firmly say that vegans are my healthiest patients. I certainly agree with you it is not easy. My position is that 90% vegan which is 19 of 21 meals a week will do just fine. Foods should be, prior to preparation, ideally organic and unprocessed whole foods exactly as they grow up out of the ground and in the field.

The struggle is real and for many a constant battle.  When people find out I’ve lost over 200 pounds they all want to know how.  So I usually spout off a few words of wisdom with the knowledge that the person who asked really wasn’t listening to what was said.  I know this because my thoughts and words have already been dismissed.  Everyone wants the easy way out.  Can I take a pill to lose weight?  What if I just eat kale and nothing else?  What diet were you on?  What do you think about surgery?  I smile and walk away shaking my head.
Losing weight is hard work.  Keeping weight off is even harder.
In 1975 I dropped down to 163 after ballooning up to 370 plus.  Earlier this year I was bouncing between 200 and 205.  I was headed back to hell and decided I needed to get serious about keeping my weight off.  For me, this meant getting serious about my food choices.  So I took a deep breath and leaned in hard back to my vegetarian ways.  I started making better choices and limited my meat and dairy to about two meals a week.  Roughly 90% of my calorie intake comes from non-animal sources.
Today I was 184.4 at weigh-in.  It’s a lot better than 200 but I’ve still got a ways to go.
The Boss and I went out for lunch today.  We tried a new place called Barrios in OKC near where The Doctor lived when he was in medical school.  I am not a “foodie” but I just had to take a picture.
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Ok…I had a bite of the Roasted Chicken with Poblano Cream & Smoked Tomato Pico.  So lunch technically wasn’t completely veggie.
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