The Tale of Two Turkeys – 2021

T-Day this year was at our house and it was just the second time in nearly 20 years we hosted. For many years we traveled to Texas and one year we ended up in Owasso OK. But this year The Texans came north. We had a small gathering of five humans and one Aussie. Shopping for a small dinner crowd like this should have been simple. But as the Great Pandemic continues to affect aspects of our lives we all have not experienced I had to go to multiple stores to find what I needed. The sandwich meat and cheese purchase was left for the last day of shopping the day before T-Day. And as I circled the store searching for bargains I stumbled upon a refrigerated display of fresh turkeys.

Yup. Dried pasta is 50% more expensive per pound. A tub of strawberries was over $6.00 at the same store. Ground beef was seven times the price per pound. So I could not resist. I bought the little fellow.

nOn Sunday I roasted Turkey Two. I decided to cook the bird and freeze portions for future meals. My mind has been wandering to the many ways of making leftover turkey palatable. But it’s not been easy since we are tired of turkey right now. So in no particular order here’s what I learned this year shopping for the feast.

Take Home Lessons

  • During The Great Pandemic in the midst of shortages you will find items overbought and undersold in the stores. Take advantage of these situations if and when you find them. I’ve come across similar price reductions in different stores usually in the refrigerated departments. As an example, BOGO imported Danish Havarti with the sell by date out in March 2022. I guess none of my neighbors like Harvarti.
  • Be flexible. If you have to have strawberries you’ll pay up for them. But it might be time to eat other fruits that are more reasonably priced. Like bananas, apples, or those tiny oranges. Dried fruits work well too.
  • Eat lower on the food chain. I picked up a pound of dried black eyed peas for $1.50 because you have to have black eyed peas for New Years in my part of the world. Eat more beans because they are good for you and good for your checking account balance. Learn to like beans.
  • Add more meat-free meals to your diet. Yesterday for lunch I had Chickpea and Sweet Potato Stew. Dinner tonight will be a massive mutant baked sweet potato and a side salad. You don’t need meat at every meal. Over the holiday weekend I happened to mention making Butternut Squash Enchilada Casserole. The reaction from our guest was priceless. I guess some people don’t like squash.
  • A six pound turkey doesn’t have a lot of turkey in it. This little fellow was kind of like a huge chicken only bonier. Still, I think I have enough cooked bird in the freezer for three more entrees.

Yup. Looks large but not a lot of meat.

3 Replies to “The Tale of Two Turkeys – 2021”

    1. I think about things that others don’t normally think about. Sometimes that’s good. Sometimes not so good. The weekly ad for my local grocery store was published this morning. I’m drinking coffee and seeing what’s on sale. Butter $2.50/lb. Eight ounce shredded or sliced cheeses $1.67. 15 ounce canned tomatoes $0.50/can. 12 ounce bags of frozen veggies $0.88/bag. Boneless chicken breasts $2.99/lb. Bartlett pears $1.49/lb. I appreciate the fact I live in Oklahoma where some food items always cost less than in other parts of the country. But what I see on the ground is a very strange inflationary environment where some things cost a hell of a lot more while other items are sold at deep discounts.

      1. Yes, it’s crazy. And it varies so much from week to week. That’s where I can see it’s good to buy things when they are deeply discounted.

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