Sugar disrupts microbiome, eliminates protection against obesity and diabetes (in mice)

Photo by Nishant Aneja on Pexels.com

After four weeks on the diet, the animals showed characteristics of metabolic syndrome, such as weight gain, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. And their microbiomes had changed dramatically, with the amount of segmented filamentous bacteria — common in the gut microbiota of rodents, fish, and chickens — falling sharply and other bacteria increasing in abundance.

Sugar disrupts microbiome, eliminates protection against obesity and diabetes — Columbia University Irving Medical Center. “Sugar disrupts microbiome, eliminates protection against obesity and diabetes.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/08/220829194721.htm (accessed September 7, 2022)

Here’s the link to the original study – https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(22)00992-8?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0092867422009928%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

I’m cleaning up my saved drafts for this blog and apologize up front if I’ve already posted this. But since this post was in my draft folder I’m pretty sure I haven’t already posted this. I need to delete some drafts I’ve kept around since 2018.

2018!!!

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SSBs and EO-CRC (Sugar-sweetened beverages and early-onset colorectal cancer)

What is already known on this subject?

Incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer (EO-CRC, diagnosed under age 50 years) has been on the rise in many high-income countries over the past two decades.

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) can exert adverse metabolic repercussions throughout the life course, including childhood and adulthood obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Despite the highest level of SSB consumption being characterised among adolescents and young adults, the association between SSBs and EO-CRC has not been investigated.

What are the new findings?

Compared with <1 serving/week of SSB consumption, higher intake (ie, ≥2 servings/day) in adulthood was associated with a 2.2-fold higher risk of EO-CRC.

Each serving/day increment of SSB intake at age 13–18 years was associated with a 32% higher risk of EO-CRC.

Hur J, Otegbeye E, Joh H, et al
Sugar-sweetened beverage intake in adulthood and adolescence and risk of early-onset colorectal cancer among women
Gut Published Online First: 06 May 2021. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2020-323450

Watch your sugar intake! Don’t think too long about that colonoscopy your doctor recommended. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer don’t think about getting tested, do it. I lost a first cousin to metastatic colon cancer.

Bob was just 49.

Yes I am aware correlation is not causation.

But life is short and science takes too long.