Eggs Are OK

The skeptical cardiologist pointed out in 2013 that there was no good evidence supporting limiting dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day. I exulted, therefore, in 2016 , when this long-standing dietary recommendation came out of the US dietary guidelines. Recognizing that dietary cholesterol doesn’t need to be limited means that eggs and egg yolks […]

via The Eggsoneration Continues: Why Does Anyone Eat Egg Whites? — The Skeptical Cardiologist

For the majority of my adult life I’ve limited my egg consumption.  In case you’ve not followed the science you might have missed the most recent studies on the connection between dietary cholesterol and heart disease.

Go ahead and eat those yolks.

Advertisements

Eat More Meat (High consumption of red and processed meat linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance)

After excluding some of the participants due to factors such as viral liver disease and alcohol abuse, close to 800 subjects were included in the main analysis, of whom a sub-sample of 357 subjects completed the meat questionnaire. NAFLD was diagnosed in 38.7 percent of participants and insulin resistance in 30.5 percent. The proportion of red and white meat intake was about one third and two thirds, respectively, which is similar to the typical diet of the Israeli population. High meat eaters were slightly younger, mainly male, had a higher body mass index (BMI), caloric intake, and a worse metabolic profile.

The results showed that high consumption of red and processed meat is independently associated with NAFLD and insulin resistance regardless of saturated fat and cholesterol intake and other risk factors such as BMI. In addition, individuals who consumed large quantities of meat cooked using unhealthy methods and those already diagnosed with NAFLD who consumed high HCAs had a higher chance of having insulin resistance.

Low carb diets are frequently recommended to prevent metabolic diseases. These low carb diets can be very rich in animal protein, especially meat. While meat contributes valuable nutrients that are beneficial to health, including protein, iron, zinc, and vitamin B12, the current study indicates that meat should be eaten in moderation and the type of meat and its preparation method should be wisely chosen.

Read the source article here.

The Unoriginal Cabbage Soup

Nothing of importance is ever achieved without discipline. I feel myself sometimes not wholly in sympathy with some modern educational theorists, because I think that they underestimate the part that discipline plays. But the discipline you have in your life should be one determined by your own desires and your own needs, not put upon you by society or authority.

Bertrand Russell

We all know better, but we don’t choose better. I was a cokehead, a heroin addict. At night you get coked up knowing you’re going to feel terrible in the morning. You have to make the habit of doing what’s difficult now to make you better. It’s easy to do the right thing when you’re used to it.

Russell Simmons

I named this soup Unoriginal because there’s really nothing original about cabbage soup.  It could just as easily be called What’s in the Fridge Soup because I had a small head of cabbage that needed to be eaten.  There were two halves of two different peppers and half an onion.  What do you do with these odds and ends?

Soup.

Something happened to me this summer.  I was a lapsed vegetarian for over 30 years and in the beginning of August I got serious about my diet (again).  Kyrie credits his diet for the recent Celtics winning streak.  Clearly something is happening to a lot of people.  It’s not just me.

Choose better.  Losing 200 pounds was not easy.  Regaining 40 pounds was easy.  Making the right food choices?  Trust me, it’s easier than you think.

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic minced
1/2 large onion, thin sliced
2 carrots, peeled cut into coins
1 stalk celery sliced thin diagonally
1/2 each red and green bell pepper, slice
1 cup frozen corn
7 oz canned diced tomatoes with juice
1 small head green cabbage sliced
1 quart organic vegetable broth
1/2 Tbsp paprika
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp dried thyme
Salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a medium size pot heat the olive oil.
  2. Everybody (except tomatoes, corn and broth) in the pool in the following order: onion, carrots, celery, peppers, garlic, cabbage.
  3. Saute until the cabbage wilts, add herbs, salt, and pepper.
  4. Add vegetable broth and tomatoes.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer.
  5. Simmer partially covered for 30 minutes.  Add corn and simmer an additional 5-10 minutes.
  6. Yum.

 

Potential long-term negative impact of high protein diets

High protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic kidney disease, according to research led by nephrologist Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine.

The research also indicates that a low protein, low salt diet may not only slows the progression of CKD as an effective adjunct therapy, but it can also be used for the management of uremia, or high levels of urea and other uremic toxins in the blood, in late-stage or advanced CKD and help patients defer the need to initiate dialysis.

Follow this link to the source article.

There is too much emphasis on dietary protein period.  Common sense dictates that even in the absence of CKD a low protein, low sodium diet is prudent.  Recently I’ve been reducing the sodium and surprisingly food still tastes good.  I really notice restaurant meals when too much salt is present.  Hell, I’m even eating unsalted cashews.

Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Source: Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Spoiler Alert

Yes.

My Father had diabetes which contributed to his early demise.

My youngest brother was diagnosed with the disease in his 20’s.  He is committing slow suicide by diet.

Way back last century when I was in my 20’s I was involved in a local professional group in Dallas TX.  The speaker I brought in was one of the country’s leading endocrinologists from UT Southwestern Medical Center.  After his talk I thanked him for his time and for enduring a dinner of rubber chicken and mushy vegetables.  But what I really wanted was free medical advice.

“Doctor, my father and brother both have diabetes.  Do you have any advice for me?”

The good doctor gave me a steely glare over the top rim of his glasses and said,

“Stay as thin as you can as long as you can.”

Boom.