Tri Tip Too

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The good news is the tri tip steak I made a while ago was deemed very good.

The bad news is I didn’t get to have any.  The steaks were smaller than I thought so I didn’t get a piece.  Same as when I was growing up, Dad would serve dinner family style and let everyone else pick their protein first.  Dad got the pieces everyone else didn’t want.  The last time I grilled tri tip steaks I got chicken.

I had to buy more.  This time I bought the entire roast and carved it into steaks myself.  At roughly a pound and a half I saved $1.50.

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The triangle pieces are small and the first cut had a pretty thick cap of fat making the “steak” even smaller.  I now understand why butchers turned this muscle into stew meat.

Tonight I am marinating the steaks in a lemon soy bath.  We’ll see how they turn out.

Update 6:00 PM

The steaks turned out great.  I froze the strip steak like pieces and grilled the smaller chunks.  I managed to cook the meat until it was medium and it wasn’t tough or chewy.  Don’t cook tri tip past medium or you will end up with chewy odd shaped hockey pucks.  The marinade turned out decent for a throw together bath.

Tri Tip Steak

The Tri-Tip roast/steak is a 1.5 to 2.5 pound triangular-shaped cut from the beef sirloin…

For years, the Tri Tip found itself as part of the bone-in sirloin steak, hanging off the end as an odd shaped strip that usually got cut off and made into kabob meat or cube steaks.  With a mere 4-5 LBS or so per animal, nobody really missed it.

via Supper is Ready!: Tri Tip: Good Eat’n, Great Price!.

Image courtesy of Supper is Ready! blog

As a kid growing up, steak was a rare treat.  Dad would pick up Top Sirloin from the local King’s Market, pop them under the broiler, and serve with baked potatoes and a vegetable.  For health reasons I don’t eat as much steak as I did when I was younger.  But every now and then I enjoy a nice steak.  My first experience with a Tri Tip was in a local restaurant and I felt this particular cut possessed extremely good beefy flavor.  At the store I found some Tri Tip steaks, grass-fed and drug free.  Tonight, we’ll be trying this cut marinated and grilled.

Sunday 02.17.13

There are three grocery stores within a 3 mile radius of the house I normally shop at.  I don’t favor one over the others as each store has its pros and cons.  Shopping the sales is a favorite pastime of mine.  There are many occasions when the evening meal is not determined until I find what looks good at the store.  And if it’s on sale I am in Heaven.  The problem I have had recently is buying too much of what’s on sale.  Who can resist the family pack of chicken tenders at $1.99 a pound?  This is the crux of my affliction.  What do you do with 10 pounds of chicken tenders and just two mouths to feed?

I admit I am getting better at not buying everything I see simply because the price is irresistible.   The worst transgression recently turned out to be 10 pounds of boneless chicken thighs.  I love boneless chicken thighs but I had a hard time figuring out what to cook with those flavorful pieces of the bird.  So I ended up freezing most of the meat.  And you end up making meals with chicken thighs for a long, long time.

For the past couple of months, I’ve been disciplining myself to buy less.  The only other solution I can think of is to find more people to cook for.  This is the hand I’ve been dealt.

Wish me well this morning.  I’m going shopping.

P.S. – I have 5 pounds of organic carrots I bought a few days ago.  Anyone have any good carrot recipes?

 

How The Internet Is Killing The Family Recipe – Big Think

Nearly half of Americans believe that in the next 15 years, more people will learn to cook from instructional videos online rather than from their parents. That’s according to a new survey of more than 1,000 Americans conducted by Allrecipes, one of the first major recipe websites.

via How The Internet Is Killing The Family Recipe | Think Tank | Big Think.

I respectfully disagree.� Besides, a sample size of 1000 carries no statistical significance.

via How The Internet Is Killing The Family Recipe – Big Think.